Supporting two temples damaged by the Noto Earthquake in Japan

Fundraising campaign by Jisho Takahashi
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There was a powerful earthquake on the Noto peninsula in Japan on New Year's Day. My thoughts go out to those who are still suffering from its effects. The death toll in Ishikawa Prefecture is over 200.

You may already know about some of the damage from the news around the world, but I'd like to show you some of the earthquake's effects on two temples connected to the Sanshin Zen Community, so that we can offer some support.

Before that, I will show you photos of an important temple which was also damaged in this earthquake, called Sojiji Soin, in Wajima.

This is the original site of the famous temple Sojiji, which was founded in 1321 by Zen Master Keizan Jokin, the “second founder” of Soto Zen. The original temple buildings were unfortunately destroyed by a fire in 1898. On that occasion, the temple was transferred to Tsurumi, Yokohama City (near Tokyo), which is where the temple we now call “Sojiji" is today. However, new buildings were also reconstructed in the temple's original location after a fire. This became what is now called Sojiji Soin (literally: "Sojiji ancestral temple"), and it remains a training monastery in its own right today. In 2007, there was a big earthquake in the same area as the recent one, and it caused quite a lot of damage to Sojiji Soin. They only recently reconstructed those buildings and the mountain gate. However, the earthquake this year severely damaged it again and to a greater extent.

It is estimated that it will cost 4 billion yen ($27 million USD) to rebuild this place.

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Now I'd like to introduce two lesser known temples which were damaged in this earthquake and have connections to Sanshinji: Ryushoji and Eifukuji. I hope we can help them.

One temple is called Ryushoji (龍昌寺) in the mountainous area in Wajima city.
The previous abbot, Rev. Waju Murata, practiced at Antaiji about 40 years ago at almost the same time as Okumura Roshi. After Antaiji, he moved to the Wajima area with his friend and made a small practice community. They practice zazen and study, as well as growing vegetables and rice and producing rice malt and miso and so on. They try to practice self-sufficiency in the Antaiji style.

Five years ago, Rev. Waju stepped down and his son became the new abbot, but they continue the same practice.

The earthquake caused a lot of damage at their temple:


The dharma hall and all the houses in the practice community are damaged. They don't use the public water supply, but instead they collect water from a spring on the mountain which is stored in a cistern. However, the earthquake destroyed this water tank. Furthermore, many of the asphalt roads leading to the temple collapsed, so it has become cut off.

The other temple is called Eifukuji(永福寺). The abbot, Rev. Koshu Ichibori, visited Sanshinji in 2017 though a Sotoshu program. He stayed here for several days, and later visited Ryumonji in Iowa and Daijuji (Great Tree Zen Women's Temple) in North Carolina.

His temple is in the main city in Wajima near the ocean. It is near a famous morning market, which is a popular sight-seeing place.

When the earthquake happened, he was at the temple with his aunt and grandmother, who is 102 years old. After the earthquake, agency officials quickly announced a tsunami warning. Rev. Koshu then carried his grandmother on his back up the mountain behind the temple in order to reach safety together. From the high vantage point of the mountain, they had to watch the nearby market and much of the city burn. He also personally witnessed many people who perished in the quake.

Needless to say, his temple was also severely damaged. Acknowledging that everything is impermanence, he knows it will be difficult to raise the funds to rebuild the temple:



I'd like to support them with your help. If you are able, please join me in supporting our temple’s friends, even if you can only offer a small amount. I will share updates with everyone on this page as the repair and rebuilding process unfolds at Ryushoji and Eifukuji over time. It will most likely take a few years to completely repair these temples.

I am cheering for everyone! Please get well together!

Organizer

Donors

  • Sten Barnekow
  • Donated on Apr 02, 2024
$50.00
  • Jôkei Lambert
  • Donated on Mar 19, 2024
$30.00
  • Anonymous
  • Donated on Mar 15, 2024
$100.00

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Donors & Comments

20 donors
  • Sten Barnekow
  • Donated on Apr 02, 2024
$50.00
  • Jôkei Lambert
  • Donated on Mar 19, 2024
$30.00
  • Anonymous
  • Donated on Mar 15, 2024
$100.00
  • Anonymous
  • Donated on Feb 29, 2024
Amount Hidden
  • Takashi Kimura
  • Donated on Feb 24, 2024
  • Via Mr.Issho Fujita’s Facebook page.

$10.00
  • Michiko Owaki
  • Donated on Feb 24, 2024
  • 一刻も早くみなさまの日常生活が戻ってきますように。お寺の再建が無事できますようお祈りしています。

$30.00
  • Anonymous
  • Donated on Feb 23, 2024
$50.00
  • Taido Oba
  • Donated on Feb 21, 2024
$100.00
  • Anonymous
  • Donated on Feb 21, 2024
$100.00
  • Anonymous
  • Donated on Feb 20, 2024
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Sawyer Hitchcock
Jisho Takahashi
Misaki Kido
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