Ozzies do LEJOG 4 Ecuador

Update posted by Andy Osborne On Aug 23, 2015

Hi,

This will be my last update for our LEJOG adventure. This is my ?statistical summary? ? in your mind please read it out in a dramatic movie-reading-things-out-man voice.

Over the last two weeks, Dad and I have cycled 980+ miles over a fourteen day period, cycling for just over 73 hours in total. Our average time cycling was 5 hours and 11 minutes a day and the average ride was 70 miles long. This resulted in an average speed of 13.4 mph. Notably, we averaged only 12.5 mph in the first week but 14.3 mph during the second week, partly the impact of the tough Cornwall/Devon start but also from our fitness levels increasing over the fortnight ? and some of our best pace was over the longest days! Our best average speed for a day was 15.1 mph, on Day 12 ? Glencoe to Inverness. This was also our joint longest day, together with the last day, from the Crask Inn to John O?Groats, at 83 miles.

The highest speed we reached was 42.5 mph on the Keswick to Moffat leg (Day 9).

From Dad?s body weight, our computer calculated that we burnt an average of 4,199 calories a day from cycling, almost twice the average daily calories in less than a quarter of that time. The most calories we burnt in a day were 4,991, on day 2. In total, we burnt 58,797 calories.

In total, we climbed a total of 17,456 meters, averaging 1247 meters each day. The most climbing in one day was 2318 meters, again on the second day.

Over the fortnight, we have passed through 3 countries and 20 counties ? 9 each from England and Scotland, 2 from Wales. We have acquired 0 punctures, 0 buckled wheels but 2 sets of very silly tan lines and very ouchy legs.

Note: you can stop reading in a deep voice now.

I?ll just wrap it all up now ? a few extra thanks - to Claire and Vince, Laura and Bob and Hop-along Linda Osborne and (not quite as Hop-along) John for putting the girls up while they were running after us and in the week after.

The fantastic fact that we?ve surpassed our target also means that Mum and Dad will be making a fantastic donation of over 400 to the great mental health charity Young Minds ? thanks again for all your donations! And thanks to all our Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100009764076191) followers, likers, commenters and well wishers.

Now, I?ve said this will be my last update, and it will be on this site, but I will probably make a sort of blog leading up to and during the Ecuador expedition next year, but until then, goodbye!!!

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An absolutely fantastic achievement. You make me quite jealous with what you have done over these two weeks.

Ian Bertram

Update posted by Aug 23

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Update posted by Andy Osborne On Aug 21, 2015

Hi,

We have now cycled from Lands End to John O'Groats.

This last day has been one of the most difficult days of them all, but also fantastic and obviously the most rewarding stage. The first 30 miles were absolutely brilliant, a very gentle downhill gradient coupled with great scenery over Loch Kilbreck and under it's big brother Ben. The surface was excellent and the prevailing wind pushing us along, so we kept up an excellent pace of over 15 miles an hour. As we got to the north coast in the small village of Bettyhill, we started to bear East and start climbing a bit more - all coastal areas tend to be a bit up and down, and we were warned of a Devon/Cornwall difficulty level for the next 15 miles until the smaller (than Bettyhill) village of Reay, where we stopped to buy lunch, then cycled down to a 'contaminated' beach (nuclear power plant in Dounreay) to eat it. I was scared of getting bitten by a radioactive midge and turning into midge-man, but Dad pointed out that I was already small and irritating. Hrmmph.

Now, while those last 'difficult' miles had been mostly downwind (meaning the hills weren't too bad), the last 30 went occasionally into the wind, meaning we had to work really hard while not going any faster (or up a deserving hill). The difference was startling - a lot of the last miles into John O'Groats were like this, but we suddenly turned for the last 1/ mile and were blown along!

We were greeted at John O'Groats by some friendly applause from some strangers who'd just done it themselves, meeting up with Grandad and Otti to take some photos by the sign, lifting our bikes up (Tour de France style). We then had some lovely ice-cream and got in the car for the mammoth journey back - (although almost as long, a little less tiring!). But if that journey will be mammoth, the journey up to John O'Groats was the giant turtle from the discworld novels (sorry if you don't know what this is all about - it was the biggest animal I could think of). We've had an absolute blast, achieved something incredible, had brilliant weather, seen some of the best scenery in Great Britain, met some lovely people and raised a fantastic amount of money for yet another fantastic adventure - all around, one of the best experiences of my life! My legs are bloody tired though.

There are lots of people to thank for making this possible, as well as an amazing experience on top of that. First, our incredible support crews - Mum, Sophie and Harriet on the first week and Otti and Grandad this week: you've been great lugging all our stuff around, patient with us and most importantly - fantastic company - we'd go crazy (-er) if we were all alone!

As well as our main support crews, I'd like to thank many times over the people who have put us up (or put up with us) over the two weeks: Michael and Judy, providing us with many vegetables at dinner at delicious pasties over the two days they let us stay; the Browns, keeping us updated with excellent weather news and praying for us as we headed along on our first (prospectively) rainy day; Rosie and Colin, with their lovely dogs, lovelier gardens and loveliest(?) company greeting us after our first two day stretch on our own and finally Satish and Janet, managing to stay upright under the onslaught of an Osborne birthday!

The next group of people to thank are the few people who have joined us throughout the rides - John Harding, riding with us on one of the most difficult days, helping us use a flatter path; his wife Debbie and their daughters Ellie and Charlotte, joining us for a lovely picnic in Dartmoor; Malcolm Woodrow, Martin and Rachel Millener and Alan and Jack Teece, for keeping us sane through a particularly not-scenic part of country, and joining us for a lovely lunch. And also to Richard Holmes who walked over 100m from his home to join us for a drink near our YHA stopover in Cheddar.

Of course, this was all about raising money for Ecudor - an absolutely massive thank you to the very many, very kind and very generous people who have sponsored us over the months leading up to this fantastic experience! We've already surpassed our target and it's still growing!!! Thanks so so so much for all your donations!

I should thank all the lovely staff at the numerous YHAs, SYHAs, B&Bs and Hotels we've stayed in - they've been very kind and provided us with delicious dinners, scrumptious breakfasts and lovely conversation!

Finally, I'd like to thank some less... Intelligent things for their contributions to this experience - the weather, scenery and the roads.

Oh. And dad.

I'll be writing a final statistical summary of the week tomorrow (long car journey!!), so this isn't the last you'll be hearing of me.

Yay!!!

(?)

Until then, goodbye!

(Very tired) Alex

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Update posted by Andy Osborne On Aug 21, 2015

During today's ride nothing really happened so I'll go over the few things that did, then talk a bit more about other, more interesting things. The ride consisted of a few large, but non-aggressive climbs, followed by short, exhilarating descents. There was a generally excellent road surface which helped make this all the more fun. The weather today, although mostly gloriously hot, occasionally went a little cloudy, but this was really a blessing, as I was actually going to sweat at a few points (I tend not to, whilst Dad got wetter today from perspiring than from the rain on that horrible day last Friday). We took the pace really easy today. I tried to make a break for it at about seven miles outside the Crask Inn but Dad called me back about a mile out, saying something sentimental about 'staying together' and 'blah, blah, blah'. I still sprinted though when I could see the inn! The scenery was excellent over one hill particularly; we meant to stop for lunch at a viewpoint, but there was another one on the near side of the hill, not quite as spectacular, so got it mixed up, having to stop again for the photo op! The place we're staying tonight is an enigmatic little pub called the Crask Inn and it's in the middle of absolutely nowhere. The nearest glimpse of civilisation is more than eight miles away, the nearest town 30! It's a lovely place though - incredible views right outside the rooms, delicious food (we had their own Lamb and Blackcurrants during dinner), very nice en-suite rooms and lovely staff. The only thing which is a little weird is that the hot water is brown, the cold water slightly yellow. Perfectly healthy colours though??! Only one day to go!!! If nothing goes wrong, the Alex in the next update will have cycled from Land's End to John O'Groats!!!!!! It's so exciting!!!!! Yippppeeeeeee!!!!!!!

Until then,

Alex



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Update posted by Andy Osborne On Aug 19, 2015

Hi,

Sorry to disappoint you, but today was a little anti-climactic. I'm sure you can guess why, but we'll get onto that later. Today was more or less dominated by Lochs - cycling along Loch Eil from Glencoe to Fort William, Loch Lochy between Forts William and Augustus and of course, Loch Ness between Fort Augustus and Inverness. Our SYHA was along a shaded path, so we started with some extra layers on. Let's just say that didn't last long... The weather was as glorious as the last two days, and we soon stopped to strip down to base layer. That first stop was also the first of many for photos - the water of Loch Eil was so still, there was a crystal clear reflection of the mountains above. We then cycled to Fort William and on, Ben Nevis looming above us - another few stops for photos! We then got off the A82, and continued for 10 miles or so on nice, peaceful and scenic country roads before stopping on a small bridge for our first Chocolate break. Then came the painful bit.

We turned right onto a wide bike path, quoted in the book as having a good surface, perfect for touring bikes. No. Just no. The surface was so horrendously bad, a simple dirt track littered with small rocks and big potholes, I'm very surprised we didn't get a buckled wheel, let alone a puncture. I remember this being such a pathetic excuse for a cycle path that it was this, not the numerous idiots on the A82, that angered me the most today. It gradually got even more unpleasant: Firstly, the surface itself tended to get worse on the gradients, meaning I had to get off my bike numerous times because I was fishtailing so badly; Second, it went on for 7.5 miles. This doesn't sound like long, but it slowed us down to such an extent that it took us an hour! Then the most beautiful sight of the day came into view: Tarmac. We re-entered the A82 just in time for Grandad and Otti to overtake us - we stopped for a nice lunch at a picnic bench overlooking a petrol station - the view wasn't nice, but the company was lovely!

Now, the anti-climax: we didn't do the climb. There was an alternative route on the flatter, but less spectacular A82, running along the other side of Loch Ness. The many reasons for this include: Dad's climbing legs weren't 'on'; It was very very hot; Dad wasn't up to it; The views over Loch Ness from the A82 were closer and still great; Dad's a wimp. I'm going to now say (so Dad doesn't delete this) that I would have really struggled as well and that he's not a wimp at all (Ed: close but I will let it go this time!)

I would have really struggled and Dad is definitely not a wimp.

Obviously the climb would have offered better views over the Loch, but the scenery today wasn't exactly Avonmouth. I think the most extraordinary view today was the aforementioned reflectiony scene over Loch Eil - the panoramic view not only took in the Loch and the mountains immediately above, but also caught Glencoe village and Ben Nevis in its far corners. Our first stretch off the A82 also offered some lovely quaint Britishness we hadn't seen since Somerset, mixed with the spectacular views over the most Lochy Loch of all the Lochs we've seen so far - Loch Lochy. Finally, the scenes over Loch Ness were the grandest of the day, if not so far (although I think the Loch Tulla viewpoint may just pip it!).

Our speed. Let's just say it was fast. Very fast. Because the whole day was flat, we managed a whopping average speed of 15.05 mph. Now, I say flat, but all the little rolling hills we went over today added up to a total ascent of over 1200m and we spent an hour going at 7mph and it was our longest day of all (joint with the last) at 83 miles - three factors which make this all the more ridiculous: before this fortnight we'd go on sprint training runs of < 30 miles at less than that speed!

Tomorrow is our penultimate day - I can't believe it!

I'm not going to say much about it, other than it's a bit shorter (66 miles) and I'm absolutely ecstatic - both at getting so far and being so close! The other thing is that we've now reached our 1600 target - thanks so so much to everyone who's donated over the months. We're keeping the fund open - there's some essential equipment I will need for my expedition it can go towards!

Yay!!

Until tomorrow, bye!

Alex

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Update posted by Andy Osborne On Aug 18, 2015

Hi,

Today was shorter than yesterday, but slightly more hilly, although the gradient map looked the exact opposite of the last two days: completely flat to start with, then a big hilly section. However, the hilly half was actually more up and down.

We started in Balloch, cycling around Loch Lomond, stopping to take photos with Ben Lomond in the background. The gradient was completely flat, but for the first few miles, the bike paths' surfaces were terrible, while the roads' were nice - another opposite to yesterday. The bike paths then smoothed out and because the road was very busy along the Loch, they were preferable, staying on them until the end of the Loch. Just after we re-entered the road, we stopped for our first break at a lovely Caf overlooking the loch. Away from the loch, the gradient started to change with a gentle but quite long ascent, after which we planned to stop in a lay-by for a chocolate bar. Just before we turned into said lay-by a familiar Kia entered it - Grandad and Otti had caught up with us! We agreed to meet up with them in an hour's time for lunch overlooking Loch Tulla. The reason they had so easily found us was because we were following the A82 all the way to Glencoe - in fact, we stay on it until Fort William - a good chunk of tomorrow as well. This takes the record for the longest time on one road (so far) - it will be 68, more than doubling the 30 mile stretch before Moffat. Although the road was quite busy at the start and we did of course get plenty of idiotic drivers, for most of the way the surfaces were smooth, the traffic manageable and the views...

Starting from the off, the scenery today was non-stop spectacular, the flat section giving us brilliant views over Loch Lomond with Ben Lomond and the first hills of the Highlands on the other side. As we ascended up, we caught fantastic scenes of the mountains and lakes. I've already told you that we had lunch at the Loch Tulla viewpoint, and it was probably the single greatest scene we've had so far - the Loch in the foreground, with huge mountains and valleys stretching for miles. The cycling after that proceeded to be the greatest series of views we've had, the mountains rising high above us on either side, occasionally catching a glance of some snow or a long, winding stretch of road we'd just been down. Then, going down into Glencoe, the mountains squeezed in closer, steeper and rockier - I reckon the biggest impediment to our speed today was actually the fact that we kept stopping to take photos! They can't capture it completely, but they are still pretty spectacular - definitely check them out on Facebook.

Now, the descent into Glencoe was supposed to be the 50 mph hill. Either that wasn't it, or the chap who told us was both pedalling very hard and hadn't been on any of the other fast hills in the south (or he wouldn't have mentioned it). We only hit 30 mph, but sustained it for about 3 miles and combined with the brilliant views, it was still the best descent so far.

Our pace today wasn't exactly sloppy either - we averaged 14.5 miles an hour, which is equal to our fastest day so far, which was also a little bit flatter. Down the hills, we frequented the mid twenties, probably staying there for about 10 miles in total. One the last proper uphill bit, we actually did 18 miles an hour - impressive for the flat, let alone a hill, albeit a gentle one.

I am a little worried about tomorrow. There is really only one climb after the long flat section and it does then descend all the way to Inverness, but there's a catch. It's a back-breakingly brutal hill, as steep as anything we've done and goes on for 5.25 miles... I had to get off after less than one mile at that kind of gradient (some of you may not have noticed - I reported it very subtly. Sarcasm).

Oh well.

Goodbye (may be not writing again!!),

Alex

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Update posted by Andy Osborne On Aug 17, 2015

Hi,

Yesterday I told you that today was our longest day, and was 83 miles long. It turns out I was wrong. That route was one including the alternative route that started with a longer detour that avoid the hills, which, not being wimps, we did not take. Because of that, today was only 78 miles, our longest actually being an 83 miler.

Another mistake I made yesterday was in criticising the terrible grammar of the Loo company - I then noticed in my first (while doing LEJOG) update I had said photo's. Unacceptable - I'll probably find a way to blame someone else, but until then, my apologies.

Now, it said that route avoided the hills, so one might expect the hills we did go up to be of a challenging nature. However, I didn't really notice any sort of difficulty in the gradient, although I still had to work quite hard. This was because during yesterday's sprint finish, I noticed a little thing in my calf, so concentrated on stretching that last night, consequently forgetting to stretch the (very important) thighs! Therefore, my thighs were complaining up the hills, and I was lucky that they were neither numerous nor steep - I think I would have struggled! We stopped after about five minutes and stretched by the side of the road, and although it didn't help instantly, I do think there was a long term difference... After about 50 miles, the rest of the day was absolutely and completely flat - following the Clyde and various Canals at 0m altitude all the way. However, we had learnt the hurtful consequences of going too fast, so took it slightly easy.

We planned to have lunch in Glasgow, but there wasn't much on our route - we eventually stopped at a very posh Hilton Cafe, where we probably spent 30.00 (maybe without the full-stop?) on a sandwich and drink!!!

It was a very nice sandwich though.

Glasgow was really nice, following cycle paths through the lovely Glasgow Green, along the Clyde and then through towards Loch Lomond. I would also like to inform my sister that contrary to her belief, Scotland is not always cold - my tan lines have (somehow) got sillier. As well as the lovely weather, we had some nice scenery, including the stunning hills outside Moffat, the Clyde's riverbank and finally Loch Lomond. Unfortunately most of the day was once again spent next to the motorway - in fact, once we missed our turning and might have just hit the border of the M7-something. We also weren't quite as lucky with the surfaces - the first 15 miles were absolutely abhorrent. Fortunately, they then smoothed out to an acceptable level, becoming very nice once we were on proper NCRs - from about 7 miles outside Glasgow to the end of the ride.

Tomorrow is a little bit shorter than today at around 70 miles, but is a little bit hillier and is unfortunately along a very busy A road all the way - not too fun. What will be fun, however, is a hill which you can apparently go down at 50 mph! As an added bonus, it also has some of the best views of the entire trip!

Until then, goodbye,

Alex

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Update posted by Andy Osborne On Aug 16, 2015

Hi,

Today marked the start of a return to tougher cycling... Supposedly! However, today seemed really good, perhaps because I've got so much fitter over the weeks. And Dad hasn't, so I look really good compared to him!

The day started with a very long climb (15 miles) out of Keswick, followed by a descent into Carlisle. The climb wasn't really too bad, consisting of lots of little hills, not very steep, followed by smaller downhill sections. At the top was, surprisingly, a portaloo! However, this annoyed me, as the company's name was spelt "Cumbria Loo's". My English teacher would be fuming! The descent was similar (but opposite), with smaller ascents - but we just rolled over them. It was down this hill we broke our current speed record, hitting 42.5 miles an hour! We then cycled through Carlisle, took some photos by the Castle, and headed toward Scotland. The rest of the route was very flat, but going more 'downhill' towards the border, then more 'uphill' toward Moffat. However, overall for the whole day we've only gone up 8m in elevation! We stopped to eat our lunch at the border (after, of course, taking the mandatory photos), courtesy of Keswick YHA. The rest of the route was fairly fast and actually stayed on one road (B7076) all the way to Moffat! That's roughly 30 miles on one road! It was a well surfaced road as well, with a cycle path all the way, although I actually spent most of the time on the road for the slightly better terrain. However, the scenery for that road wasn't too great, as it followed the M6 all the way. Dad reckons it used to be the main road, which is why it was so very straight, well surfaced and quiet (My logic here is that if it is basically the M6 but a B road, there would be no motivation to go onto it for a car - unless of course it was congested!). About 17 miles out of Moffat, we stopped to have a cereal bar and we tried out one of those energy gels - normally for 'emergencies', but we had plenty with us! Now, I don't know whether it just worked ridiculously well on us, or we had loads of energy, but we then absolutely blasted the next hour (which was all it took - I don't know, but we probably did average 17-18 miles an hour on that bit!). We never really dropped below 15 (only on the minute or two that Dad thought he could lead), and on one flat (if anything, it was slightly uphill) with a lovely surface, we hit 25 mph consistently. We frequented > 20mph and spent most of the time at 17-19! Another thing is about our predicted time of arrival, which is displayed on the Gizmo's screen. When we left from that last rest, our ETA was about 4.00pm. We gradually got it down so far that we arrived more or less at 3.30!

Tomorrow is by far the longest stage at 83 miles, but the terrain looks very similar to today's - a long but mild hill up and down, then flat until Loch Lomond. Also, Dad kindly gave us the option of extending it to 97 (the Loch Lomond YHA has shut down, so we're staying quite a while away) but I politely declined ("What? No. You're crazy."). Still, long way!

Until then, bye!

Alex

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Update posted by Andy Osborne On Aug 16, 2015

Sorry this one's late - I told dad to do it!

Hi,

I am writing this update with the sincere fear that I will catch pneumonia. This sounds familiar...? Actually it wasn't too bad, after the first 2 hours or so of absolutely miserable conditions. We set off at about 9 am, agreeing that there would be no point in postponing it, planning to have breakfast in Bolton. This was not a cunning plan at all... We only skirted Bolton, and the next place we could have breakfast was in Blackburn, 24 miles away from the start in Leigh. By that time, we were very wet, very miserable and very wet. Did I say we were very wet? We tried to be optimistic - lots of humming of a certain Monty Python song worked for a while! We then stopped off in a recommended cycle shop to try to get some more waterproof waterproofs. As soon as we got in, they offered us a hot drink! We then went and got ourselves matching waterproofs which were, as we later discovered, very good! We then cycled about 3 miles onto the other side of Blackburn to have a very late breakfast in a lovely cafe recommended by the cycle shop. We then set of towards the next place on the map - Whalley. "Where's Whalley?" I hear you cry.

Just outside Blackburn!

It then promptly stopped raining.

Kind of. There were still occasional showers in this dry period and obviously it was still cold and damp, but it was much less uncomfortable than earlier, but that riding was really quite good, feeling quite fast and climbing particularly well. Or at least I was.

Although there were a few town areas - Blackburn was horrible in the centre (although nice in the two outskirts we were in) - there were also some absolutely fantastic views - primarily the forest of bowland, which as well as trees, has sheep, cows and moor... (See what I did there?) There were also some lovely moors just before Blackburn, but unfortunately both the visibility and our mood were too poor for us to really appreciate it!

We lunched in a pub in Slaidburn, the village we would have stopped in if following the book, where we met a fellow LEJOGer who had a puncture so couldn't do his stage today, from there to Keswick. Talking of our extension of the course, which we have been using for the last week, this has been for a very special reason... It's my Birthday tomorrow! We have been getting ahead so we are about 20 miles into tomorrow's ride, so we have a shorter ride of 'just' 50 miles - we then plan to do something with the family and have a nice dinner out as well. I was also looking forward to opening my presents as well, but I've already done that!

Until then, bye!

Alex

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Update posted by Andy Osborne On Aug 15, 2015

Hi,

First thing I would like to say is: Happy Birthday to me! It's been a great day, although it actually started (celebrations wise) yesterday night, roughly a day before I actually turn 15 at 8 o'clock tonight. We were staying at Janet and Satish's, who are good friends of Grandad's and kindly offered to put us up (or put up with us!) for the night. There we had some birthday cake and opened most of my presents! Then we had a lovely breakfast and opened some more prezzies before setting off to our start point.

The second thing I'd like to say is sorry about yesterday's update - the wifi was weak at Janet and Satishes, with no signal either to be able to use 3G.

Today's ride was only 48 miles, and was relatively flat. This should mean we could get to Keswick quite early, but we set off late and then got lost getting to Gressingham, so we only started cycling at about 12. This eventually meant we got to Keswick at about 5, meaning were not going to 'do' anything special, but we are going to go out for a nice meal...

Now - enough of my birthday! How was the cycling today? Well, we started off at a good pace, averaging about 15 mph until Kendal, where we had a nice drink in a cafe. The towns in Cumbria, I've noticed, are noticeably nicer than the slightly southern Lancashire towns - we went through Warrington, Leigh and Blackburn, and although they do have nice bits, they were mostly a bit grotty, and meant a period of 'badness' in the general scheme of things. However, today we've been through Kendal, Windermere and Keswick and they are really lovely places! We then navigated out of Kendal (it's a one way system!) and set off to Windermere. We stopped off to buy some lunch at a service station-Spar, then cycled a little to Ambleside to have a pleasant picnic by the side of (surprisingly not Amble) the Windermere lake.

Then we promptly got stuck in traffic... Funny that we've been through many big towns and cities throughout the week's course, but not really had problems with congestion, then through a peaceful national park we do! However, fortunately there was a good cycle path by the side so we managed to avoid a bit of it! The section from the Windermere area to Keswick then proceeded to be some of the nicest cycling so far. There was a long but fairly easy climb up to a lake of some description (maybe Derwent?) on a very well surfaced and wide road. In fact, I think it was a dual carriageway, but there were no markings to determine lanes, and not many cars, so we got no agro whatsoever. We then turned off the A road onto the other side of the lake on another well surfaced, and even quieter road with both spectacular views of the lake and mountains, but also peaceful woody areas of gently curving road. This was also mostly downhill, before turning back onto the A road after the end of the lake and a very fast descent into Keswick. The YHA is absolutely lovely as well, overlooking a small river with nice decor on its front side.

We've had very nice weather, adding to my stupid tan lines, although we did have a 30 minute period of light rain near Lunchtime. So overall...

A great birthday!

Today we crossed both the halfway mark and the 500 mile mark! Tomorrow marks the start of the Scottish stages, going through Carlisle and finishing in Moffat. Today is also the last day the girls are following us, with Grandad and Otti (his helper, family friend and generally awesome gal) taking over for the rest of the trip! It also marks the first day I'll be cycling at the age of 15 (I was born at 8pm) and a return to the 'real' routes - we used that extra distance today! So lots of landmarks!

Until then, goodbye

Alex

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Update posted by Andy Osborne On Aug 13, 2015

Hi,
Today was, in all honesty, easier than yesterday! However, it took a lot longer because it was the longest cycle either of us had ever done, at a whopping 80 miles! We started off the day by cycling into Shrewsbury for breakfast, as we wanted to start very early to avoid the apparently bad weather. I say cycled but really it was just a long descent, not much pedalling, although when we did we managed to hit our maximum speed of the day, which was just over 40 mph - the second fastest so far. In Shrewsbury, we took some photos of the Quantum Leap statue, then crossed the road to a pub, where people were already drinking beer, at 9 o'clock! We had a big breakfast, each with a drink and it still just cost less than 10 - wow!
That bit of the day was downhill and because the naturally occurring uphill to accompany that had been completed the previous day, the rest of the route was absolutely and completely flat. This meant we could keep up a really good speed, and despite the very long length of the ride, we averaged a fantastic speed of 14.5 mph!
Today, for about 2 hours, I used Dad's gizmo (Sat Nav for the bike). Although this was fun for me to know things about the ride (I get a bit annoyed when I don't know how far it is to go and how long that will take), I haven't got used to it, so there were a few detours, which probably set Dad back about a mile in total. I say Dad because most of these detours were his fault for being deaf! I'd say ?left? perfectly loudly but he'd just keep going! Unfortunately, since I had the gizmo, that extra distance wasn't recorded!

We stopped after about two hours at a little village store to fill up our water bottles and get some extra snacks for lunch. We eventually stopped at Frodsham and sat next to a nice old chap on a bench.
I'm not going to do my usual bit on the scenery today, because it was rubbish - mediocre, standard countryside, then grotty town bits through Warrington...
Now, tomorrow: good news and bad news - good news is that it will be shorter than today - 'only' 68 miles, where I thought it was 85! However, it is a bit hilly tomorrow and worse, will likely be raining all day - nothing even a climatologist can do about that... Oh well, better get on with it!!

Alex

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Well done Alex. Way to go :)

Akshay Velraj 8W

Backed with £10.00 On Sep 18, 2015

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Well done! What a fantastic achievement.

Frances Greaney

Backed with £5.00 On Sep 03, 2015

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Well done Alex, I have been meaning to sponsor you all along as I have followed your progress on FB, but never seemed to get round to it. You have done such an amazing challenge, fantastic!!! :D

Claire Ashton

Backed with £10.00 On Aug 30, 2015

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Well done both of you!

Kathryn O'Malley

Backed with £20.00 On Aug 26, 2015

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well done for your amazing achievement.

keren

Backed with £10.00 On Aug 21, 2015

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Well done boys!!

Chris Mike and Seb

Backed On Aug 21, 2015 Amount Hidden

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I enjoyed the little part I cycled along with you - well done on the whole thing!

Malcolm

Backed with £20.00 On Aug 21, 2015

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Well done lads see where your sister gets her madness from now !

Debbie jackson

Backed with £20.00 On Aug 21, 2015

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What an amazing challenge and achievement! Look forward to seeing the update on the final day and celebrations tomorrow!

Moira Gallagher

Backed with £30.00 On Aug 20, 2015

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Steve Taylor

Backed with £20.00 On Aug 19, 2015

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Steve Taylor

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