Menstrual cups for refugee women in Nigeria

Update posted by Nadine Haumann On Jun 09, 2016

On Saturday morning, May 28th, we arrived at the idp camp of Kochingoro, Abuja. This date also marked International Menstrual Hygiene Day.

After driving through a nice neighborhood with new buildings and schools, a dusty road led us to the camp in the outskirts of Abuja. People living there have lost their homes to the terror inflicted upon them by the Boko Haram in Nigeria's north, even the children had witnessed family members and friends hacked to death by the terrorists.

Children were running around and playing when we parked the car, curious about what we were doing. We met Ladi, the women leader of the camp, a tall and strong woman in her mid 30s. She already was informed about our project and now assembled the women on the central square near the little school that was sponsored by one of the foreign embassies in Abuja. We put some of the benches and tables together for the women to sit on, under the shade of a tree. With the help if Ifeanyi's lovely Aunty Ruth I introduced the menstrual cups, informed them about their benefits, explained briefly how they are used, and answered questions. We had also prepared a little questionnaire for the women interested in a cup. As menstrual cups come in different sizes, this should help us to find the right size for each woman. We asked for their age, if they had already given birth and how heavy their menstrual flow was. Many women told us they have a heavy flow, sometimes with clots, and asked if they could still use the cups. I could almost feel some relief when we told them that the cups are especially helpful in this case, as they just collect the menstrual fluids instead of absorbing them, and they have a much higher capacity than pads or tampons. Honestly I was surprised how high the interest was, and in the end we had handed out all 80 questionnaires we had prepared. There was even some fear that we wouldn't have enough money to get a cup for all of them, but luckily it was more than enough, also thanks to about 23 cups that had been donated directly and that I brought with me.

Back home we went through the questionnaires, sorting them by the needed sizes, and we also found women for the donated cups. Thanks to the generous help of Nwadi, the owner of “Luv Ur Body” menstrual cups, placing our order went smooth and easy, and a few days later we had two boxes with the cups we needed for the women. Also we even still had some money left, so we decided to get a bar of soap for each woman to help with personal hygiene as well as some supplies for the camp in general, like rice, oil, tomato paste and salt. We got these from my beloved Wuse market in Abuja, a lively and crowded place filled with all kinds of goods from food to household wares, from electronics to clothes and fabrics. Ruth is a master in bargaining, ensuring we get the best price.

On Saturday, June 4th, we returned to the camp. This time we assembled the women in the little makeshift church. Ruth helped again with translating to Hausa, as not all women understand English well. We handed out some info sheets to help explain a few general things about female anatomy before explaining how the menstrual cups are used, how to keep them (and yourself) clean to prevent infections, we shared tips and tricks and discussed questions. Finally we handed out the cups by name, so each woman would get a cup that we think would fit her best. In the end we could even have handed out a few more, and I have been asked if we would do more projects like this in other places, too. Really, I was overwhelmed by the interest! While I was promoting the project to find donors I met so much skepticism by the people, many doubted that Muslim women would use an internal product, or that the hygienic conditions would be sufficient. But we had Muslim and Christian women sitting side by side, all genuinely interested in a simple little product that can make a woman's life so much easier. They told us that so far they had to use rags to deal with their periods, it's not always easy to wash them properly, often leading to infections. The menstrual cups, being made from medical grade silicone, are easy to keep clean by simply boiling them in water regularly. The soaps we provided should help in emphasizing that it is important to always wash your hands before handling your cup.

We sincerely hope we made the life of the women at least a tiny bit easier, and wish we could do more projects like this in the future. We have even been told about women having to prostitute themselves to be able to buy some pads... while a menstrual cup could be an easy and affordable solution, as they last for up to 10 years if you take good care of them!

The owner of “Luv Ur Body” cups was also very moved by our success in the camp and would be interested to support further projects like this. I am so glad we found her, and as the company is also situated in Nigeria, it was so easy and effective working together on this, also we supported a local company rather than bringing cups from Europe. We are so thankful for her ongoing support and help!

www.luvur-body.com


We will continue working on this topic, hopefully being able to support more women with cups and education about women's health and family planning. Thank you all again for your help and support! Without you we couldn't have done this!


All the best,

Nadine & Ifeanyi


We assembled for a group photo afterwards

Add a Comment

Update posted by Nadine Haumann On May 23, 2016

Dear friends and supporters,

our campaign here has come to an end and we are eternally thankful to each and every one of you! You might be wondering what we are doing now, as we only reached about 40% of our designated goal (including our offline donations). Don't worry! We are doing this project with the money we have. Yes, we were hoping to do more, but we will work with what we got. Help is needed now and not in months. Also we were able to reduce some costs and received several cups donated directly, that are just as valuable to us.

I will fly to Abuja tomorrow, and on Saturday, which is also "Menstrual Hygiene Day", we will visit the camp of Kochingoro for the first time. We will inform the women about the cups and women's health, how to use them and what to expect of them, to find out, how many of the women want one and which sizes we'll need. Then we can buy the needed cups directly from "Luv Ur Body" and return to the camp to hand them out and teach about proper use and hygiene.There will also be time to discuss any other topics around women's health.

I am very happy to have gained the support of Dr. Maria Hengstberger and her organization "Aktion Regen", who offered me educational material and when I'll be back in Vienna we will certainly continue to work together. Her aim is to support women in developing countries with education and knowledge about family planning, contraception and women's health in general, and she's working on this sucessfully for many years now.

http://www.aktionregen.at/

I also thank the lovely women of the women's rights group of Amnesty International in Vienna, who offered me support and initiated contact to "Aktion Regen", and I can't wait to work with you ladies again and further on.

I would also like to say a big thank you to the Tree Sisters Community I found on social media - and can you believe that: Out of the countless pages, websites and organizations I contacted to ask if they would share our project, they were the ONLY one who did! Even those who promised first to do so, too, backed out and were never heard of again. Honestly I am disappointed and was hoping that women's rights groups and - advocates and feminists would be more supportive of each other. Well, we did it without them, but with YOUR help, for which we are so grateful!

I would also like to thank the "Menstruationstasse" group on Facebook, who offered so much support! Many of you donated or sent me cups, and you kept me going with your nice and supportive words! And of course I want to thank each and every one of you who donated so generously and believe in this cause!

And of course we are thanking YOU! Without you we wouldn't be able to do this! We thank each and every individual who supported us with donations so generously, you all have a place in our hearts eternally <3 You are the center of this, and you are showing: We all can achieve something if we work together for a change to the better.


Ifeanyi and I are also thinking about writing a little book or series of articles about our experiences with this project, the hard work (I often felt like having two full-time jobs), the disappointments, the empty promises, the little mental breakdowns, even the end of a friendship - but mostly about the overwhelming love and support! I have never organized something like this campaign before and I am grateful for all the experiences I gained and will now gain when finally doing what we aimed for: Going where help is needed and doing what we can there.

We will keep you updated! If you want, head over to our Facebook page where we hopefully can post updates about the camp very soon (if the Nigerian internet will let us :))

https://www.facebook.com/menstrualcupsfornigeria/

I will prepare for my trip to Abuja now (still haven't packed a thing) and I'll see you all soon!

Thank you for everything!

Yours,

Nadine

photo

also want to thank you for your iniative! Don’t be disappointed, that you didn’t get as much money as was planned, because I think everything one does is better than doing nothing - and what you did is far more than nothing. We can’t change the world just like that but we can do it by being persistent! I am not on facebook so I will not follow your campaign there but I wish you a succesful and good time in Abuja! Warm wishes, Elvira (Berlin)

Elvira Hanemann

Update posted by May 23

photo

Thank you so much, Elvira! Yes, you’re right, and what we can do is much better than nothing :) Honestly I thought it would be easier, so I’m more than grateful for what we got. And it need not be the last time we do something like this! Best wishes, Nadine

Nadine Haumann

Update posted by May 23

Add a Comment

Update posted by Nadine Haumann On Apr 13, 2016

Dear friends and supporters,

as we haven't reached our goal yet in the amount of time we planned and hoped for, we decided to add more time to our campaign. We are thankful for everything you've done for the women in the idp camp of Kochingoro, but we haven't raised enough yet to be able to support the women to the extent needed. As one cup costs us about 14€, the amount raised as of today would provide only about 56 pieces, and we still have to finance other expenses like transport, administration and a little something for our additional helpers we will recruit when working on location.

We kindly ask for your further support: Please share our campaign, tell friends and family! Invite friends to our facebook page! Blog about us! Help us get more publicity! Every tiny thing is greatly appreciated!

Currently Ifeanyi and I are even taking notes for a little book about our experiences, the ups and downs in our way to achieve our goals to support these wonderful women in the camp, who endured so much.

Thank you for your ongoing support! We couldn't do this without you!

Take care!

Nadine

Add a Comment

Update posted by Nadine Haumann On Mar 20, 2016

Dear friends and supporters,
we want to say thank you for all your help and support so far, it really means a lot to us and every tiny thing you do is highly appreciated. We already raised almost 600€! Today we are asking for your help again to keep spreading the word about our project so we can find more supporters.You are here because you care about the women and girls in the camp of Kochingoro/Abuja. So chances are your friends and family would like to support this cause too. Tell them about it, online and offline! Here's what you can do:

  • Invite friends to our Facebook page
  • Tell your friends offline, too!
  • Engaged in a discussion on a similar topic? Tell about our project, in comments for example, and link back to us!

  • You have a website or blog with a similar topic? Tell about us!
  • Buy something in my charity sale on my Facebook page "Klara Kleingeld". All revenues directly go into our funds! So treat yourself with something nice! (international shipping options available for most items)
    You find it here: https://www.facebook.com/KlaraKleingeld.shop/
  • Are you a member of a group that might be interested in this cause? Share our project with them! Maybe you can raise some funds together!
  • If you have a menstrual cup you don't need, maybe because you bought it too small or too big, you can send it to me (Klara Nadine) and I will take it to Abuja to give to one of the women in the camp. Message me on our Facebook site for my adress!
  • Make your donation now! Head over to the main page of our fundraiser site to donate directly via Paypal. If you prefer to make a bank transfer, message me for details! Every tiny bit helps!


Thank you so much for your ongoing support! You are great and we couldn't do this without you! <3

If you have more ideas, share them with us in a comment!

Love,

Nadine & Ifeanyi

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Liebe Freunde und Unterstützer,

vielen lieben Dank für eure großartige Hilfe bisher! Zusammen haben wir schon fast 600€ gesammelt! Jedes kleine bißchen, das ihr getan habt und tun könnt schätzen wir sehr! Wir fragen hier noch einmal nach eurer Hilfe, um mehr Unterstützer zu finden, damit wir endlich richtig loslegen können. Ihr seid hier, weil ihr euch um die Frauen und Mädchen im dem Flüchtlingslager in Kochingoro/Abuja sorgt und sie unterstützen möchtet. Die Möglichkeit ist also groß, dass eure Freunde oder Familie auch helfen möchten. Erzählt ihnen von unserem Projekt, online und offline! Hier einige Ideen, wie ihr uns etwas unter die Arme greifen könnt:

  • Teilt unsere Fundraiser-Seite und Facebook-Seite auf euren social media Kanälen und erzählt dazu in ein paar Sätzen, warum ihr uns unterstützt.
  • Ladet eure Freunde auf unsere Facebook-Seite ein: https://www.facebook.com/menstrualcupsfornigeria/
  • Erzählt euren Freunden und Verwandten auch "offline" von uns!
  • Ihr seid gerade Teil einer Diskussion, die sich mit einem ähnlichen Thema befasst? Erzählt von uns, z.B. in den Kommentaren einer Website, und verlinkt zu dieser Seite!
  • Du hast eine Website oder einen Blog, der zum Thema passt? Erzähl dort von uns!
  • Gönnt euch etwas in meinem Charity-Verkauf auf meiner Facebook-Seite. Alle Erlöse gehen direkt in den Spendentopf! Und ihr habt noch was Schönes für euch :) https://www.facebook.com/KlaraKleingeld.shop/
  • Seid ihr Mitglied einer Gruppe, die sich für uns interessieren könnte? Erzählt ihnen von uns! Vielleicht könnt ihr ja gemeinsam als Gruppe Spenden sammeln. Auch wenn nur jeder einen kleinen Betrag dazugibt, kommt so trotzdem einiges zusammen.
  • Du hast eine Menstruationstasse, die Du nicht brauchst, weil sie vielleicht ein Fehlkauf war? Du kannst sie mir gerne zuschicken und ich nehme sie mit nach Abuja, um sie einer der Frauen im Camp zu geben. Schick mir eine Nachricht über Facebook und ich gebe Dir meine Adresse!
  • Sende uns jetzt Deine Spende! Jeder noch so kleine Betrag hilft uns weiter! Wenn Du nicht mit Paypal spenden möchtest oder kannst, schick mir eine Nachricht für andere Möglichkeiten.


Wir danken euch ganz ganz herzlich für alles! Ihr seid toll, und ohne euch könnten wir das gar nicht machen! <3

Du hast weitere Ideen? Teil sie mit uns!

Liebe Grüße,

Nadine & Ifeanyi


Add a Comment

Update posted by Ifeanyi Egbuta On Mar 15, 2016

Looking malnourished and unkempt, with a baby clutching her breasts trying to suckle a flattened breast, Christiana Estephanus, a 23 year old woman, from Gwoza, in Borno State, who fled her village after it was rampaged by the terrorists, managed to give us a cheerful smile as we exchanged greetings in Hausa Language. She was a farmer back in her village, and her husband was a butcher. She narrated the horrors she experienced as many of the men in her village were killed by the Boko Haram terrorists, so the women and children fled into the mountains, as she fled with her children, a bullet whizzed past them, but luckily none of them was hit. The Boko Haram fighters caught up with them and forced them back to the village. Luckily she and her family escaped, and fled to Cameroon. While in Cameroon, she got news of the death of her uncle, so she traveled to Lassa in Bornu state for the burial, after the burial, she had to return to Cameroon as her homeland was still very volatile and unsafe as the rampage of the Terrorists continued. Shortly after, she got another message that her father and brother have been killed by the insurgents, she had to return to her village, and from there she and her family moved on to Yola, then to Taraba, from where they relocated to this camp. She says that life has been better since she came to this camp, due to the benevolence and goodwill of NGOs and private individuals who have supported them and provided them with food and other needs, but it is not the same as it would have been if they could fend for themselves while living in their own homes. She says, among their most desperate needs are, medical care, food, and clothing. She also urges the world to pray for her mum, who is still living under the bondage of the Boko Haram, and also her brother and his family still in Cameroon, unable to come here because of lack of money.

Add a Comment

Update posted by Nadine Haumann On Mar 15, 2016

Dear friends and supporters,

we now also set up a Facebook page for our cause, so you can get updates and news more easily. Visit us there, share your thoughts, ask questions! And share it with your friends and family to help us grow and reach our goal together! We are so thankful for all your support!

https://www.facebook.com/menstrualcupsfornigeria/

I also support our project with my small business and set up a little charity sale on my Facebook page. I sell handmade things like hair accessories, bags and some jewelry. Everything is "name your own price"! I can offer international shipping options, just ask me for details if you live outside Europe. So far most info and descriptions are in german, but you can ask me anything in english, too! I'm looking forward to meet you there. Shop for the good cause! :)

Just go to Fotos -> Albums -> Charity-Sale

https://www.facebook.com/KlaraKleingeld.shop/

Love,

Nadine

Add a Comment

Update posted by Nadine Haumann On Mar 12, 2016

One question I even asked myself when we started working on this project was: Why menstrual hygiene products? Aren't there more important things to support these people with, like food?

You are right, food is the most fundamental thing we can provide. But we decided to support the women for a number of reasons.

According to a UNICEF study in two countries in west africa in 2013 - Burkina Faso and Niger - about menstrual hygiene at school, school girls miss up to 20% of valuable school time because they are menstruating and have no suitable products and/or restrooms to deal with their periods. For fear of stains and being mocked for them, they stay at home, missing on education. "The Cup" working in Kenia tells about the same problems, and they provide menstrual cups for school girls to help them overcome this problem - with good results. I have even been told that the female friends and relatives of the girls who got a cup are jealous and want their own. "The Cup" also tells about girls who have to prostitute themselves to be able to buy pads - a thought that makes me sad and angry at the same time...

I think it is crucial to support especially women, as they are still fighting oppression throughout the world, while at the same time it is generally agreed on that it is mostly women who hold a family together. They do the majority if not all of the housework, they nurse and feed their children, they provide food and clothing. I believe if we support and strengthen the women we help the whole families. A woman who does not have to stay home several days each month because she is on her period, can much better support her family. If she doesn't have to spend money each month on pads and such, she can rather use this money to buy food or other necessary things. At the same time she can gain autonomy over her own body again, learning about her bodily functions and understanding herself better, which is, in my opinion, a fundamental thing to empower women everywhere. We are often silenced, our bodies are burdened with taboos that prevent us from understanding them in order to keep us quiet. But it is important to know about your bodies and what they do, to understand menstruation, to learn what is normal and what could be a sign of an illness or infection, so we can stay healthy.

Is is often said, strengthening women and girls is the best investment you can make.

Menstruation is a perfectly natural thing, and no woman should have to feel ashamed for it. Many young girls, I often read, don't even know what's happening to them when they get their first menstruation. It must be extremely scary if you suddenly start bleeding "down there" without understanding why! When I talked to Nwadi from "Luv Ur Body" menstrual cups she told me that even many grown women she talked to have no understanding of their own anatomy. I think, keeping women and girls intentionally uninformed about their own bodies is a way to keep them oppressed.

We wish to offer a way out, to assist in making life for women and girls easier, to show them their strength. I'm not a saviour, and women don't need to be "saved". But we saw and have been told about a need and see a possibility to help out, and that's why we started to work on this campaign, simple as that. Even if we can just make a difference for a handful of women we already achieved so much. Will you join us?

Just yesterday I came by chance upon this wonderful quote that fits perfectly :)

photo

I really like all the toughts you state here and I agree with them a 100 %! There’s only one thing that I am not sure about (as a woman who only tried these cups for a while) is the hygienic point. If you don’t have the possiblity to wash them out several times per day (and I really doubt that all the women have this opportunity) than couldn’t they be getting infections? I would love to hear that this fear of mine is exaggerated. Nevertheless: I wish you much success with this project! Elvira from Berlin

Elvira Hanemann

Update posted by Mar 12

Add a Comment

Update posted by Nadine Haumann On Mar 07, 2016

We say we care, yet we ignore those who really need our help.

We spend thousands of naira on recharge cards, or a hundred dollar on a pretty shoe, yet we cannot spare a cent for a good cause that can turn a life around.

We talk about making the world a better place, yet we fold our hands and do nothing when we are called to actually make the world a better place.

We talk and talk about the suffering of people around the world, yet we fail to realize that a little act of compassion can ease the suffering of one life.
In our hearts we find justifications for ignoring posts like this, and at best giving it a “like”.
If a thousand likes could solve problems, then we would have run out of problems a long time ago, but unfortunately it doesn’t.

I am not writing this posts to get likes and encouraging comments, but I am writing this cos there is a need, which can only be solved by action.


On my first visit to Kochingoro IDP camp as part of a team, I was moved to tears to find children, women and families living in the most horrible conditions I have ever seen. Without electricity, water or health care. Hungry children staring at me with faces void of laughter nor cheery smiles. Every one of them I spoke to, gave me accounts of the horrors that befell them in their villages which made them flee to the camp. More than a few witnessed family members hacked down by boko haram terrorists. And now, where they seek help, help has become a mirage. On my second visit, we analysed their needs and challenges. Together with my Partner Nadine, who inspired the project to tackle female hygiene, we have decided to take the first step in solving the many problems these refugees face. We have decided to do something rather than stand by and hope.


I call out to everyone who believes that even in the slightest good deed, a life can be saved or made better. Instead of ignoring, a single act of kindness can change the world.

Be a part of this project and make the life of someone a lot better than it is.

God bless you all

Ifeanyi

Add a Comment

Update posted by Nadine Haumann On Mar 04, 2016

Für die, die lieber auf deutsch über unser Projekt lesen möchten, hier alle Infos:

Unser Projekt:

Wir wollen Frauen und Mädchen in einem Flüchtlingscamp nahe Abuja in Nigeria mit dringend benötigten Hygieneprodukten versorgen. Menstruationstassen sind hierfür die perfekte Lösung, denn sie bieten sicheren Schutz für bis zu 12 Stunden am Stück und sind lange haltbar (bis zu 10 Jahre!), das macht sie zusätzlich äußerst umweltfreundlich. Unser Ziel ist, mindestens 100 Menstruationstassen an Frauen und Mädchen zu verteilen, und sie außerdem über die richtige Anwendung und die nötige Hygiene unterrichten, auch für Fragen und persönliche Betreuung nehmen wir uns Zeit.

Wir haben das Camp vorab mehrmals besucht und mit einigen der Frauen gesprochen, um sicher zu stellen, dass unsere Idee auch tatsächlich in einer Weise hilft, die benötigt and gewollt wird. Wir haben wertvolle Unterstützung durch "Luv Ur Body" Menstruationstassen, ein Unternehmen mit Sitz in Nigeria. Die Möglichkeit, die benötigten Tassen direkt vor Ort zu bekommen erlaubt uns, besonders effektiv zu arbeiten.

Sollten wir mehr Spenden sammeln können, als wir für die Menstassen benötigen, können und werden wir das Camp zusätzlich mit anderen dringend benötigten Dingen unterstützen, wie Nahrungsmittel, Windeln, Schulmaterialien für die Kinder und alles, was sonst gebraucht wird. Die Menschen in diesem Flüchtlingscamp haben ihr Zuhause aufgrund des Terrors durch Boko Haram im Norden des Landes verloren und sind fast ausschließlich auf Hilfe von außerhalb angewiesen.


Unsere Geschichte und detaillierte Informationen:

In letzter Zeit rückt die Menstruation zunehmend ins Bewusstsein und immer mehr Frauen sind es leid, diesen natürlichen Vorgang zu verstecken, verheimlichen oder dafür mit Scham belegt zu werden. Rupi Kaur aus Toronto postete ein Photo auf Instagram, das sie im Bett mit einem kleinen Blutfleck auf dem Laken und ihrer Pyjama-Hose zeigt – etwas, das sicher fast alle Frauen nur zu gut kennen – und die Social Media Seite entfernte das Bild, weil es gegen die Community-Richtlinien verstoße. Rupi Kaur wehrte sich mit Hilfe ihrer Follower – und erreichte schließlich, dass das Bild blieb.

Kiran Gandhi machte letzten Sommer Schlagzeilen, als sie den London Marathon „frei fließend“ ohne Tampon oder Binde lief, um ein Zeichen gegen „period shaming“ zu setzen und wurde dafür von vielen Frauen gefeiert.

Und besonders „alternative“ Hygieneprodukte rücken immer mehr in den Fokus, zahlreiche Blogs und mittlerweile sogar Frauenzeitschriften berichten über Menstruationstassen und waschbare Binden. Obwohl praktisch keine herkömmliche Werbung für Menstruationstassen gemacht wird, verbreitet sich die Kunde, übers Internet, im Freundeskreis, in der Familie, Frauen lieben diese wunderbaren kleinen Helferlein, und empfehlen sie liebend gerne weiter. Ich selbst benutze eine Tasse seit einigen Jahren, und möchte sie nicht mehr missen! Es scheint, als entstünde um diese umwelt- und körperfreundlichen Produkte eine Art eingeschworene Schwesternschaft – da ist es nicht verwunderlich, dass auch der soziale Gedanke mitspielt. Denn mit dem vermehrten schamfreien Reden über die Menstruation steigt auch das Bewußtsein dafür, dass nicht alle Frauen Zugang zu Hygieneprodukten haben. Wie so oft trifft es überwiegend die Ärmsten der Armen: Obdachlose Frauen, und Frauen in Entwicklungsländern. Während für uns der Zugang zu Binden, Tampons und anderen Produkten selbstverständlich ist, sind diese für viele Frauen nicht verfügbar oder sie können sie sich schlicht nicht leisten…

Was ist eine Menstruationstasse?

Die Menstruationstasse ist ein kleiner, flexibler Becher aus Silikon oder medizinischem Kunststoff, der in die Vagina eingeführt das Menstruationsblut auffängt. Die Tassen haben alle Vorzüge von Tampons, aber keinen ihrer Nachteile: Sie sind hygienischer, trocknen die Scheidenflora nicht aus, sind bis zu 10 Jahre verwendbar, vermeiden Müll und sind bisher auch nicht mit dem berüchtigten Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) in Verbindung gebracht worden. Die Pflege ist einfach, es genügt, die Tasse mit Wasser und evtl. milder Seife zu waschen und regelmäßig auszukochen. Und sie erlauben Frauen die größtmögliche Freiheit während der Periode!

Hoch die Tassen! Unser Projekt und die Idee dahinter

Auf meiner 5wöchigen Reise nach und durch Nigeria letzten Herbst ist mir auch hier aufgefallen, dass der Zugang zu Hygieneprodukten oft schwierig ist, viele Frauen wissen nicht einmal, dass es entsprechende Produkte gibt, und behelfen sich mit Lumpen, Papier oder Stoffresten. Häufig bedeutet aber auch, die Periode zu haben schließt Frauen und Mädchen von Alltagsaktivitäten aus, und Mädchen verpassen regelmäßig wertvolle Schultage. Mangelnde Hygiene aufgrund unzureichender Behelfe, um das Menstruationsblut aufzufangen, führen nicht selten zu Gesundheitsproblemen und Infektionen – davon abgesehen, dass sie unbequem und unangenehm zu tragen sind.

Und noch etwas ist mir in Nigeria aufgefallen: Müll und Müllentsorgung ist häufig ein großes Problem. Wegwerfbinden und Tampons aber bilden im Laufe des Lebens einen immensen Müllberg, der ganz einfach zu vermeiden wäre: Mit wiederverwendbaren Produkten wie Stoffbinden und eben Menstruationstassen.

Wegen der langen Haltbarkeit der Tassen (5 bis 10 Jahre!) wird also nicht nur viel Müll vermieden, sondern auch Hilfe und Nutzen für lange Zeit gewährleistet. Würde man an bedürftige Frauen Tampons und Binden verteilen, wären diese innerhalb kurzer Zeit aufgebraucht und der Bedarf an Nachschub versiegt nie. Mit einer Menstruationstasse hat eine Frau für Jahre ausgesorgt – für eine sorgenfreie Periode. Da eine Menstruationstasse gut und gerne 12 Stunden Schutz liefern kann, macht sie Frauen unabhängiger, sie sind nicht mehr so stark auf öffentliche Toiletten angewiesen (wenn es überhaupt welche gibt), sondern können ihre Tasse in Ruhe morgens und abends im häuslichen Umfeld wechseln, während sie tagsüber nicht mehr an ihre Periode denken müssen. Ganz ehrlich: Seit ich die Tasse verwende, hat sich mein Leben während meiner Periode mehr als vereinfacht – für diese Frauen kann sich noch viel mehr verbessern! Und wenn kein Geld mehr für Wegwerf-Binden ausgegeben werden muss, bleibt mehr übrig, um für sich und seine Familie zu sorgen.

Wo Hilfe am nötigsten gebraucht wird: Flüchtlingscamp bei Abuja

Wir haben uns Gedanken gemacht, wie wir die Vorzüge der Tassen für bedürftige Frauen zugänglich machen können und wo diese am nötigsten gebraucht würden. Es gibt in Nigeria leider viele Möglichkeiten, die größte Tragödie spielt sich derzeit jedoch vermutlich im Norden des Landes ab, wo aufgrund des Terrors der islamistischen Boko Haram Gruppe seit etwa 2010 rund 1,5 bis 2 Millionen Menschen ihr Zuhause verloren und fliehen mussten. Der breiten Öffentlichkeit wurde Boko Haram auch durch die Entführung hunderter Mädchen bewußt, von denen bisher nur wenige befreit werden konnten. Als Terroristen im Januar 2015 die Büros der Satirezeitschrift "Charlie Hebdo" in Paris stürmten und 12 Menschen ermordeten, starben zur gleichen Zeit rund 2000 Menschen durch Boko Haram. Die Terrororganisation soll sich 2015 offiziell der Terror-Miliz „Islamischer Staat“ (IS) angeschlossen haben. Regelmäßig kommt es im Norden des Landes zu Anschlägen, zu denen sogar junge Mädchen benutzt werden – eine Selbstmordattentäterin in Kano war gerade mal 11 Jahre alt. Tausende Menschen haben ihr Leben verloren und wurden ermordet, vor allem Christen aber auch Muslime, die die Sekte nicht unterstützen wollen.

Eines der Flüchtlingscamps befindet sich am Rand der Hauptstadt Abuja. Bei Besuchen dort konnten wir mehr über die Zustände erfahren. Derzeit leben knapp 1000 Menschen in dem Lager, das aus improvisierten Unterkünften und Zelten besteht. Das Camp wurde bereits im Jahr 2013 errichtet und wird vor allem von Flüchtlingen aus den Bundesstaaten Borne, Yobe, Adamawa und Bauchi bewohnt. Viele von ihnen sind Farmer, eine Arbeit zu finden ist sehr schwer. Jüngst gab es einige kleine Verbesserungen, die Wasserversorgung wurde durch eine Pumpe mit Generator und eine kleine Solaranlage ausgebaut, so dass zumindest Zugang zu sauberem Wasser besteht. Es gibt jedoch nahezu keine medizinische Versorgung, zwar gibt es einen Container mit der Aufschrift „Klinik“, doch ist er offensichtlich noch nicht in Betrieb, ab und zu kommen Ärzte für einfache Untersuchungen, doch die Versorgung mit Medikamenten ist unzureichend, Malaria und Typhus gefährden vor allem die Kinder.

Mittlerweile gibt es eine kleine Schule im Freien unter einem Baldachin für die jüngeren Kinder etwa bis Grundschulniveau, eine Organisation versucht, weitere Schulbildung zu ermöglichen. Andere Helfer organisieren berufsbildende Trainings, an denen ein paar der Bewohner jeweils teilnehmen können.

Da jedoch kaum jemand Arbeit findet, um für den eigenen und den Lebensunterhalt der Familie aufzukommen, sind das Camp und seine Bewohner nahezu ausschließlich auf Hilfe von außerhalb angewiesen. Es besteht Bedarf für viele Arten von Unterstützung und Hilfe, wir haben uns entschieden, mit der Unterstützung der Frauen anzufangen. Ist es uns möglich, mehr Spenden zu sammeln als wir hierfür benötigen, werden wir unser Engagement ausweiten und die Menschen mit Nahrungsmitteln, Windeln, Schulmaterialien und anderem, was noch benötigt wird, unterstützen. Kein Cent wird vergeudet!


Was wir tun wollen

In Interviews haben Frauen bestätigt, dass Bedarf für gute Frauenhygieneprodukte da ist, viele haben vorher nicht einmal gewusst, dass es diese Produkte gibt und behalfen sich mit Lappen und Stoffstücken.

Wir möchten mit unserem Projekt diesen Frauen helfen und sie mit Menstruationstassen ausstatten. Helfer vor Ort werden uns dabei unterstützen, den Frauen die richtige Anwendung zu erklären und zu zeigen, damit die Tassen richtig benutzt werden. Wir haben vor, in kleinen Gruppen zu arbeiten und auch für persönliche Gespräche nehmen wir uns Zeit. Alle Spenden fließen zu 100% in dieses Hilfsprojekt!

Mit den Spenden werden wir den Kauf der Menstruationstassen sowie die nötigen Ausgaben für Transport, Schulungs- und Informationsmaterialien, Gebühren, Verwaltungsaufwand und eine Aufwandsentschädigung für unsere zusätzlichen Helfer finanzieren. Wir werden unsere Spender über unsere Fortschritte auf dem Laufenden halten und ausführlich über die Aktion selbst berichten, mit Photo- und Videomaterial, damit ersichtlich ist, wohin die Spenden fließen.

Wir haben auch Kontakte zu einer örtlichen Gesundheitsorganisation, die sich sehr interessiert an dem Projekt zeigt und dieses bei Erfolg gerne ausweiten möchte. Andere, ähnliche Projekte zeigen gute Erfolge. Manche Hersteller von Binden und Tampons etwa spenden an obdachlose Frauen. Das Projekt "The Cup" versorgt Schulmädchen in Kenia mit Menstruationstassen – und dort werden diese dankbar angenommen. Viele Mädchen versäumen Unterricht weil sie kaum ausreichende Hygieneprodukte haben und während ihrer Periode zuhause bleiben müssen. Die Tassen erlauben ihnen, sich freier zu fühlen und auch während der „Tage“ allen Aktivitäten nachgehen zu können. Unser Vorhaben ist von dieser Initiative inspiriert.

Solche Hilfsprojekte zeigen, dass viel Bedarf für solche Produkte besteht – und dass Frauengesundheit und Frauenrechte eng zusammen hängen. Beides sind Themen, die mir sehr am Herzen liegen. Habe ich in der Vergangenheit selbst etliche kleinere Projekte sowie Frauenrechtsorganisationen unterstützt, möchte ich selbst aktiv werden und dort helfen, wo es dringend nötig ist. Wir haben Unterstützung vor Ort, die gewährleistet, dass auch alles dort ankommt, wo es soll, die hilft, Sprachbarrieren zu überwinden und die Kontakt zu weiteren Helfern herstellen kann. Denn ich finde, was für „uns hier“ selbstverständlich ist, sollte es überall sein. Und die Periode ein natürlicher, schamfreier Vorgang im weiblichen Körper, der so angenehm wie möglich gemacht sein sollte.

Unsere Unterstützer

Wir sind begeistert, eine perfekte Partnerin für unser Vorhaben gefunden zu haben und haben wertvolle Unterstützung durch "Luv Ur Body" Menstruationstassen gefunden. Wir stehen in Kontakt zur Inhaberin des Unternehmens mit Sitz in Nigeria und können die Tassen zu besonderen Konditionen bekommen. Da wir die Tassen direkt vor Ort kaufen können, sparen wir Ausgaben für Transport, Versandkosten, Zölle und Gebühren und können noch effektiver arbeiten. Zudem können wir ein junges Unternehmen vor Ort unterstützen. Wir freuen uns riesig über diese Zusammenarbeit!


Mit Deiner Spende hilfst Du uns, Frauen in Nigeria zu unterstützen, die Autonomie über ihren Körper zurück zu gewinnen und ihre Periode unter menschenwürdigen Bedingungen zu erleben. Denn was für uns hier selbstverständlich ist, sollte es überall sein!

Herzlichst,

Nadine & Ifeanyi


Add a Comment

photo

Guest

Backed with €20.00 On May 20, 2016

photo

Anonymous

Backed with €20.00 On May 18, 2016

photo

Guest

Backed On May 17, 2016 Amount Hidden

photo

Miwa Fabijenna

Backed with €5.00 On May 14, 2016

photo

Guest

Backed with €10.00 On May 13, 2016

photo

Guest

Backed with €10.00 On May 13, 2016

photo

Guest

Backed with €15.00 On May 13, 2016

photo

Angela Preh

Backed with €15.00 On May 13, 2016

photo

Juliane Ziehm

Backed with €20.00 On May 13, 2016

photo

Tatjana Stuber

Backed with €10.00 On May 13, 2016

SHOW MORE COMMENTS
Add a Comment

photo

Nadine Haumann

Campaign Owner

flag Vienna, at

send a message

I am 37 and currently live in Vienna, Austria. I work as an artisan, making handmade hair- and bridal accessories, owning a small business since 2011.

photo

Ifeanyi Egbuta

Partner

flag Abuja, ng

send a message

My name is Ifeanyi, Egbuta Ifeanyi. I have a degree in History and International Relations. Currently working as a fitness trainer.

photo

Tai Nguyen

Following Since May 16, 2016

photo

Angela Preh

Following Since May 13, 2016

photo

Juliane Ziehm

Following Since May 13, 2016

photo

M Johnson

Following Since May 01, 2016

photo

Anita Roy

Following Since May 01, 2016

photo

Deborah Hudson

Following Since May 01, 2016

photo

Sarah Goodhart

Following Since Apr 25, 2016

photo

Daniela Leitgeb

Following Since Apr 17, 2016

photo

Ifeanyi Egbuta

Following Since Mar 14, 2016

photo

Sonja Chatterjee

Following Since Mar 12, 2016

SHOW MORE FOLLOWERS