Help me rein in the yoke of poverty where I live, through sorghum.

Fundraising campaign by Anthony Kalulu
  • US$6,670.00
    Donated So Far
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In Uganda, my region of Busoga is the talk everywhere, when it comes to ultra poverty.


Across Uganda, whenever people are expressing pity for specific places in terms of poverty, Busoga is always the talk -- yet Uganda as a whole is among the poorest countries in Sub Saharan Africa.


If you spoke to any person elsewhere in Uganda, i.e., those who do not live in Busoga, and asked them what they know about Busoga, the very first thing that they will tell you is the severe poverty.


That’s, even those people in other parts of Uganda who themselves live in chronic poverty, and who themselves do not have anything -- as long as they belong to a place other than Busoga -- one thing that they will tell you about Busoga is the ultra poverty. Yet they don't even live here. The Uganda National Bureau of Statistics (UBOS), too, agrees.


The poverty here is the subject of every news headline. Every headline. Every headline. Every headline. Every headline. Every headline. Every headline. Every headline. Every headline.



A few numbers:


Some estimates have put Busoga's poverty rate at ~14%. But the most believable report, also by UBOS, is the one that says our poverty rate is actually 74.8%, against a national average of 63%.


And the deeper you go into the remote countryside, the harder people’s circumstances become. So, if you factored out Busoga’s urban places, such as the popular tourist city of Jinja, and others, it is safe to say that the poverty rate in individual remote rural communities in Busoga’s countryside, such as my village of Namisita, is well in the 90%+, or even beyond 95%.


Because, the fact is: the poverty here is unspeakable.



Life across Busoga even still has a near-ancient feel:


In 2010, Busoga was the talk allover Uganda, because of a full-blown jigger infestation. Nine of our 11 districts were invaded by jiggers and, putting poor hygiene apart, these jiggers were squarely blamed on the biting poverty here, & the poor housing conditions most people live in.


And it isn’t even over yet. Those jiggers were here with us long before they became national news, and every now and then, they still haunt us. And again, it is all because of nothing but ultra poverty.



Even Museveni also finds Busoga's poverty a bit strange to him:


On October 29, 2022, Uganda’s president Museveni visited Busoga. He was appalled by the poverty he saw here, asking “how do you people live through this?


So much so that he even promised never to come back here, unless there was some visible change on the scale of poverty in this place. The Monitor, one of Uganda’s major newspapers, also quotes Museveni as being “deeply devastated” by the poverty he saw here on his visit.


And, as someone who has spent my whole life here, I can assure you, what Museveni saw is the smallest part of the real picture. There are entire households here that can’t even afford soap or salt. There are those that only earn as little as Ugx 50,000 – Ugx 100,000 (or $13 – $26) in an entire planting season of four months. And there are those that only have rags for beddings and clothing in their houses.


After all, even at national level, 60% of working Ugandans only earn a measly ~Ugx 200,000 ($54) monthly, well below $1.9/day. But in Busoga, Uganda’s most impoverished region, many are unemployed.



My two neighboring districts, Kamuli & Buyende, are even worse:


Like elsewhere in Uganda, and in Sub Saharan Africa as a whole, poverty here in Busoga tends to be rife -- and very, very unforgiving -- in the countryside. Kamuli & Buyende are Busoga’s remotest area. The two districts together sit on 3,300 sq km, and are home to over a million people, but life here is about nothing but ultra poverty.


In Kamuli & Buyende, it is even very hard to find anything that is happening to end extreme poverty.



Help me change this:



My name is Anthony, a farmer here in Kamuli, in eastern Uganda. My own life has been defined by ultra poverty.


As a person, it is only years now, from the very first time I exited those days where I could practically go a full day without any food. But the more I have realized the true extent of poverty in my region as a whole, the more I have decided I won't sit back.


Since 2019, my nonprofit, the UCF, has been helping the poorest rural households in Kamuli & Buyende, escape extreme poverty through income generation from white sorghum. Here is me visiting some of those farmers who have taken part in this work in 2022:



At the start of the pandemic in 2020, our sorghum project had been in progress for only one planting season (we started this work in the second planting season of 2019), then covid came and disrupted our activities for the much of the last 3 years.


Right now, both because of the economic hardship arising from covid, and the underlying grip of poverty in our region, an increasing number of farmers have shown interest in taking part in our sorghum project, and my goal is to expand this work across Kamuli & Buyende. So, I am asking anyone who is reading this, to help us raise the needed support.


One way you can help us raise support, is by creating your own mini-fundraiser on our behalf, by tapping "support" at the top of this page.


To see how the money raised on this page shall be used, please go here.


But overall, my goal is to scale this work across Kamuli & Buyende, and to catalyze mass adoption for white sorghum across our region. Mass adoption will not only help move many rural poor farmers from poverty, but also, it is what will bring self-sustainability. Details.


A few of those farmers who have taken part in this work since 2019:



P.S: - I also have a bigger plea, and a bigger fundraiser, asking humanity to help me use my remaining time on earth to contribute to a lasting, self-sustainable path from poverty in my region.


Thank you,

Anthony Kalulu

Founder, UCF.

Email | twitter

Organizer

Donors

  • Remmelt Ellen
  • Donated on Feb 08, 2024
$100.00
  • Anonymous
  • Donated on Dec 17, 2023
  • 🙏😐

$500.00
  • Anonymous
  • Donated on Dec 16, 2023
Amount Hidden

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Donors & Comments

42 donors
  • Remmelt Ellen
  • Donated on Feb 08, 2024
$100.00
  • Anonymous
  • Donated on Dec 17, 2023
  • 🙏😐

$500.00
  • Anonymous
  • Donated on Dec 16, 2023
Amount Hidden
$120.00
  • @the_spkr
  • Donated on Nov 22, 2023
$50.00
  • Remmelt Ellen
  • Donated on Nov 20, 2023
  • Let's get a thanksgiving chain going ⛓ This is donation number 2, after Benjamin's $50. When we reach four donations ($200), one farming family can obtain the training and materials to grow white sorghum (a climate-change-resistant crop). * Note: that's the variable cost for 6 months. Also need to cover more fixed costs to allow this to scale.

$50.00
$50.00
  • MOHAMMAD ISMAM HUDA
  • Donated on Aug 23, 2023
$250.00
  • Benjamin Harbakk
  • Donated on Jul 23, 2023
$50.00
  • Thu Nghiem
  • Donated on Jul 19, 2023
  • For sorghum seed for the fall season.

$750.00
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Followers

10 followers
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