CORAL RESTORATION REEFS TO IMPROVE ECOSYSTEMS

Fundraising campaign by Daniel Green
  • US$14.00
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Our organization continues to restore coral reefs.Coral reef restoration strategies use natural and anthropogenic processes to restore damaged coral reefs. The reefs have been damaged for a number of natural and anthropogenic reasons, and efforts are being made to repair the damage and restore the reefs. This includes fragmenting mature corals, placing live fragments on lines or scaffolds, taking care of the fragments as they recover and grow, and transplanting the fragments to their final positions on the reef when they become large enough.Threats to coral reefs Some types of anthropogenic activities, such as coral mining, bottom trawling, channel digging and explosive fishing, cause physical destruction of coral reefs, damaging the solid structure of the skeleton of calcium carbonate corals. Another serious threat to coral reefs is associated with chemical degradation. Pollution of the marine environment by sunscreens, paints and the mining industry can lead to the appearance of chemicals toxic to corals, which will lead to their decay. Often, as a result of pollution, eutrophication can occur in coral reef ecosystems, limiting the supply of nutrients from corals. In addition, increased CO2 emissions from human activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels, can affect the acidity of ocean waters. Ocean acidification occurs when excess CO2 reacts with ocean water and lowers the pH. In acidic conditions, corals cannot produce their carcass.Fragmentation is a technique used to split a wild coral colony into smaller fragments and these smaller pieces are grown into additional coral colonies. These fragmented colonies are genetically identical to the host colony. Up to 75% of the host colony can be removed without adversely affecting its growth rate. This allows researchers to move forward with restoration projects with little, if any, impact on the growth rate or survival of the original colony. The practice of fragmentation is used in virtually all coral restoration strategies in use today. Several different methods for growing fragmented corals are described below. Fragmentation allows about 8 times the productivity increase compared to the original donor coral. The degree of fragmentation of the donor coral is determined by the amount of space available for attachment. While fragmentation has great potential, it should be avoided at high risk of disease and storms, as it increases the potential risks of these stressors. This strategy may not be optimal for some species that are less adapted to fragmentation or have slower growth rates. In vertical line nurseries, coral fragments are tied to a rope suspended in the water. One end of the line is attached to the buoy and the other end is attached to the seabed. The corals in this type of nursery are connected directly to a vertical line in the water column. Planted corals near the island of Maldives In hanging line nurseries, two vertical nurseries are placed at a distance from each other so that they are vertically parallel in the water column. Then they are connected together with a rope perpendicular to the perpendicular between them. The coral is then attached to this rope, but it hangs partially from the rope, so there is less contact with the rope itself. Less contact between corals and suspension lines results in less partial coral mortality. While these designs have some partial mortality, studies show high survival rates for the entire kennel (both upright and hanging). Growing corals on line structures increases the distance between coral colonies and potential predators, benthic diseases, and there is less room for competition. Corals grown in line nurseries must be moved to fixed substrates after the initial growth period, while corals grown in stationary structures can grow indefinitely. Children's stationary structures are frames attached to the seabed. These nurseries are often made from materials such as PVC, plastic mesh, and cinder blocks. There is probably no difference in growth rates between corals grown horizontally in stationary nurseries and those grown vertically in line nurseries. Although the survival rate of these catteries is lower than that of linear ones. A 2008 study found fixed structure kennels had a 43% survival rate and 100% linear kennels. Initial mortality in fixed structure nurseries is also likely to depend on the time of year when the corals are replanted. It is important to limit the stressors that newly grafted corals are exposed to. Coral Tree is the first nursery of its kind to have corals completely suspended in the water column. The low cost and availability of materials to create these coral trees make them an ideal propagation method. These hatcheries are less susceptible to wave damage, there is less interaction between benthic predators and disease, and there is a reduced risk of entanglement for other marine life (compared to line hatcheries). Because these nurseries are only anchored in one place, the impact on the seafloor is minimal, they are portable and easily carried by one person, and can be easily adjusted if depth is an issue.

Organizer

We are not a government organization that cleans the oceans of garbage.

We are not a government organization that cleans the oceans of garbage.

Donors

  • Miller
  • Donated on May 23, 2023
$5.00
  • Linda
  • Donated on May 02, 2023
$1.00
  • Lin Ol
  • Donated on Apr 28, 2023
$1.00

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Donors & Comments

5 donors
  • Miller
  • Donated on May 23, 2023
$5.00
  • Linda
  • Donated on May 02, 2023
$1.00
  • Lin Ol
  • Donated on Apr 28, 2023
$1.00
  • Kel Pol
  • Donated on Apr 28, 2023
$2.00
  • Diane
  • Donated on Apr 28, 2023
$5.00

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